Charity

At the Gary Sinise Foundation, we serve our Nation by honoring our defenders, veterans, first responders, their families, and those in need.

We do this by creating and supporting unique programs designed to entertain, educate, inspire, strengthen, and build communities.

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       "Only a life lived in the service of others is worth Living."

                                                                      Albert Einstein


We mourn the loss of a dear friend, neighbor, former CPD detective, spokesman and supporter of the 100 Club of Chicago.  Actor Dennis Farina passed away on July 22 at the age of 69.  A police officer for 18 years and generous through and through, Dennis asked that donations be made to the 100 Club in leu of flowers.

      

  • The Barbara Sinatra Childrens Center
    The mission of the nonprofit Barbara Sinatra Children’s Center at Eisenhower is to provide counseling for victims of physical, sexual and emotional child abuse, and to focus on prevention, community education and breaking the cycle of generational abuse. Services are provided regardless of a family's ability to pay.
  • Easter Seals Chicago
    Easter Seals Metropolitan Chicago (ESMC) has built a new $36,000,000 Therapeutic School and Center for Autism Research in the Illinois Medical District (IMD) that will help meet the needs created by the explosive growth in autism. This unique facility is the only one of its kind to combine on a single campus educational, research, training, early intervention, school-to-work transition and independent living capabilities. Nowhere else in the country is this “continuum” of services for children with autism so well integrated at a single campus facility.
  • Actors for Autism
    Actors for Autism is a performing arts and digital film making organization that provides programs for individuals with disabilities ages six and up. Programs include acting, film making, animation, claymation, dance, music, social skills, performing arts academy and vocational training.
  • Autism Speaks
    At Autism Speaks, our goal is to change the future for all who struggle with autism spectrum disorders. We are dedicated to funding global biomedical research into the causes, prevention, treatments, and cure for autism; to raising public awareness about autism and its effects on individuals, families, and society; and to bringing hope to all who deal with the hardships of this disorder. We are committed to raising the funds necessary to support these goals. Autism Speaks aims to bring the autism community together as one strong voice to urge the government and private sector to listen to our concerns and take action to address this urgent global health crisis. It is our firm belief that, working together, we will find the missing pieces of the puzzle. Autism Speaks. It's time to listen.
  • Tutor/Mentor Connection
    The Tutor/Mentor Connection (T/MC) is dedicated to improving the availability and quality of comprehensive, long-term, volunteer-based tutor/mentor programs in high-poverty areas of the Chicago region and other large US cities through an ongoing, dynamic exchange of ideas.
  • ACT Today for Military Families
    One out of every 88 military children has a diagnosis on the autism spectrum. It is well established that with early and effective treatments, children with autism can make significant gains and greatly improve their overall quality of life. ACT Today! for Military Families is committed to providing funding and support for military families impacted by autism. Your donation will help military children achieve their full potential.
  • Home Boy Industries
    Homeboy Industries traces its roots to “Jobs For A Future” (JFF), a program created in 1988 by Father Gregory Boyle while he was serving as pastor of Dolores Mission parish in Boyle Heights. Begun as a jobs program in 1988, offering alternatives to gang violence in one of the toughest neighborhoods in the city, the program soon grew beyond the parish. With the addition of a small bakery in a run-down warehouse across the street from Dolores Mission, JFF had its own business, one where it could hire the most challenging, difficult to place young people in a safe environment. The hope was that they could learn both concrete and soft job skills, to make them stronger, better prepared candidates for permanent employment. A tortilla stand in Grand Central Market downtown solidified the evolution of JFF into Homeboy Industries. In only a few years, Homeboy Industries has had an important impact on the Los Angeles gang problem, with young people from over half of the region’s 1,100 known gangs seeking a way out through Homeboy. Thousands of young people have walked through the doors of Homeboy Industries looking for a second chance, and finding community. Gang affiliations are left outside as these young people work together, side by side, learning the mutual respect that comes from shared tasks and challenges.
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copyright 2013 Joe Mantegna